British designer Lee Broom and his New York apartment

Lee Broom’s New York home is incredibly glamorous. A 280-square-metre duplex spread across the fifth and sixth floors of a 147-year-old cast-iron building in the heart of Tribeca.

As one might expect from the British designer, the penthouse carries all the hallmarks of his design brand: contemporary and playful with its roots in classical design, always precise and elegant.

Lee wanted to use his second home – he’s mostly based in London – to showcase his own products, his collection of vintage furniture and art and also as a place in which to experiment with interior design.

lee broom minimalist home new york

Stephen Kent Johnson

‘My apartment in London is open-plan, so, design-wise, everything needs the same sort of look and feel. It’s very minimalist,’ explains Lee, who lives there with his partner in life and business Charles Rudgard. ‘This space allowed me to explore different colour schemes and textures, and to create a series

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This Portland Home Was Designed to Feel Like a Parisian Apartment

Photo credit: Haris Kenjar
Photo credit: Haris Kenjar

From House Beautiful

Tudor-style bungalow homes from the 1940s with small kitchens and disjointed flows are fairly common in northeast Portland, and the one that JHL Design was hired to renovate for a family of three was no different. But rather than seeing problems, the Portland-based interior design firm saw possibilities: original mahogany woodwork, original hardwood doors, and small details like intact picture rails in the formal living spaces. So, together with Thesis Studio Architecture, the team worked out a plan that added only 150 square feet to the footprint—but through what JHL Design principal Holly Freres calls “a rearrangement of space” made the home feel significantly larger.

Photo credit: Haris Kenjar
Photo credit: Haris Kenjar

The first step was to reconfigure the entire main floor, which contained a narrow kitchen and two bedrooms at the back of the house. The bedrooms, Freres explains, “monopolized access to the private,

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