“Great design isn’t enough. We need homes that will get us to net-zero”

To reduce carbon emissions, architects and designers need to change the way they design homes, writes Geraldine de Boisse, vice president of innovation at renewable-energy supplier Bulb.



a woman wearing a blue shirt: Geraldine de Boisse


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Geraldine de Boisse

The way we live and work has changed. While we might not know exactly what normal looks like anymore, we know we need to act now to tackle the climate crisis. And that includes everyone in every industry.

Great design isn’t enough. We need homes and offices that will get us to net-zero. Construction work accounts for 36 per cent of global energy use and 39 per cent of CO2 emissions. It’s therefore crucial to future-proof buildings and make them green. That includes changing the way we design, power and heat our homes and offices.

Until now, most of the gains we’ve made in tackling the climate crisis haven’t affected people’s daily lives.

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Theory Design to feature interiors for homes in Isola Bella at Talis Park

Fort Myers – Theory Design announced it is creating the interior design for all Seagate Development Group model and custom homes in the Isola Bella neighborhood at Talis Park. Isola Bella is an exclusive 4.5-acre enclave of the last single-family waterfront homesites in this luxury golf community. This includes Seagate’s furnished Monterey II and Revana models – which are sold and under construction – and Seagate’s furnished Sonoma model – which is under contract and just broke ground. Theory Design is also creating the interior design for Seagate’s Olema model – which is under contract and set to break ground next month. R.G. Designs is featuring architectural design throughout Isola Bella.

While all homesites are sold out or under contract, the Monterey model is still open for viewing Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. For more information or to schedule

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Inside Blackberry Farm’s Stylish Push into Real Estate and Home Design

Perhaps because most Blackberry houses are not primary residences, Bell says his on-site clients are usually ready to have fun with their interiors. “The unique beauty of what we provide our clients is the feeling they get when they stay as a guest at Blackberry—but they get to keep it forever,” Bell explains. “We reproduce the Farm or Mountain for them with their spin. We call it the ‘Blackberry state of mind.’”

Engaging regional talent is important to the design team. Bell hires local East Tennessee artisans and makers when he can, from visual artists and furniture makers to ironworkers and cabinetmakers. “We have a millworker here who’s as good as someone in New York or Los Angeles,” he notes at one point.

One project that used several local makers was the Farm home of Shai and Kate Waisman, who worked with the in-house design team. The NYC-based couple first

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7 home design trends that could go from hot to dated in a few years

Grass-green shag carpet evokes the Nixon era on the lower level of my family’s turn-of-the-century farmhouse. The wall-to-wall floor cover, like a teddy bear underfoot, was all the rage in 1974, when my grandparents left urban life to retire at the homestead.

Most trends — appliances in harvest gold and avocado, reflective brass fixtures, open floor plans and ultrahigh ceilings — date homes to a particular time in history. My grandmother’s green shag selection is no different.

Although no designer has a crystal ball, some styling choices are sure to date your home to 2021. Here, three experts offer alternatives to today’s trends that may fade.

Modern farmhouse

White board-and-batten walls, industrial accents and neutral tones: The design world has exploded with the modern farmhouse look, mostly thanks to Joanna Gaines of “Fixer Upper” fame. “The most popular trends are the ones that date the soonest,” says Melissa Lee, principal

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