Home Designs Changes in 2022 – What Is Out of Style

Home design trends come and go. Styles that are all the rage eventually get overused and become outdated. We all know that sensation of style fatigue — you feel like you’ve seen the same thing over and over, and just want something new and fresh.

As we head into 2022, there are several trends that we’ll be saying goodbye to. In some cases, these trends have been slowly fading away for years because they’re impractical or difficult to maintain, while in other instances, the COVID-19 pandemic caused homeowners to embrace other options.

These are the interior design trends you should pack up and store away… at least until the cycle finds its way back around again.

modern and open kitchen with large glass windows

Kitchen trends that won’t be trendy in 2022

Avoid these design trends if you want to keep your kitchen from looking stuck in the past.

Faux finishes

Homeowners are looking for materials that

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Mom designs her entire home like the 1970s

A mom in Chicago has turned her house into a tribute to the 1970s. 

Corbyn Hanson Wittig, 51, moved into the four-bedroom home with her three kids and her husband last year. She told SWNS that some of the items that had been left behind by a previous owner inspired her to renovate the entire house into the 1970s theme

In the process of renovating, Wittig said she and her family have opted to only use secondhand items.

WOMAN HAS THE WORLD’S LARGEST ‘HARRY POTTER’ MEMORABILIA COLLECTION

“It feels like the right time to find alternatives to buying new due to climate change, so we turned to secondhand first,” Wittig told SWNS. “If you’re paying the same or less, why would you go and buy a bin from Target when you could get the same or cheaper vintage?”

Corbyn Hanson Wittig decided to transform her new home into a 1970s haven when she moved into the house last year. (SWNS)

Corbyn Hanson Wittig decided to transform her new home into a

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Inside the Grand Designs property so stunning the developer refused to sell and moved in his family

A BRIGHTON property wowed its developer so much that he took it for himself, moving his whole family into the contemporary home.

The unique wildflower-covered roof and the Japanese-inspired layout are only some of Hove House’s stand-out features, resulting in property boss Paul Templeton deciding not to put it on the market.

A Brighton property wowed its developer so much that he took it for himself

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A Brighton property wowed its developer so much that he took it for himselfCredit: Baobab
Property boss Paul Templeton moved his whole family into the contemporary home

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Property boss Paul Templeton moved his whole family into the contemporary homeCredit: Baobab

Paul, who owns property development company Baobab Developments, spent over two years working on the stunning single-storey home, where it was intended for a lucky future customer.

His company specialises in building homes with a clear architectural slant, and the very private, sanctuary-like Hove House stood out amongst the city’s abundance of huge extensions and four-storey properties.

The compact home features in tonight’s episode of Grand

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Grand Designs viewers stunned by urban home the size of a London tube carriage

GRAND Designs viewers could not believe their eyes when they saw a house so tiny it was the size of a London tube carriage.

The Channel 4 series presented its annual, House of the Year special, and featured the tiny home in south London.

Grand Designs viewers were in awe of a tiny house built in London.  The 'Slot House' is 2.8 metres wide and the size of a London Tube carriage

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Grand Designs viewers were in awe of a tiny house built in London. The ‘Slot House’ is 2.8 metres wide and the size of a London Tube carriage
The Slot House was designed by architects, and married couple, Sally and Sandy Rendel

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The Slot House was designed by architects, and married couple, Sally and Sandy Rendel
Some of the home's features include exposed materials which allowed more space as nothing was plaster boarded.

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Some of the home’s features include exposed materials which allowed more space as nothing was plaster boarded.

The ‘Slot House’ was designed by married architecture couple Sally and Sandy Rendel.

They built the house in a 2.8 metre gap alongside their home and come up with a series of innovative ideas to make the most out of the small space.

Sandy

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