Given the choice, most decorators with a personal design itch would scratch it by moving from one house to another, exchanging one expertly completed realm for a new challenge, ad infinitum. That would not be Kit Kemp, the effervescent British interior designer who is also the creative director and cofounder, with her husband, Tim, of the eccentrically chic Firmdale Hotels, an international hospitality empire composed of 10 smart hostelries and eight fizzy bars and restaurants, stretching from London to New York City. “I’ve lived in other places before, but I’m going to stick with this one,” she explains. “I’m no quitter.”

<div class="caption"> Kemp (right) and her daughters Minnie (center) and Willow lounge on the drawing room sofa, which wears a linen by <a href="https://www.raoultextiles.com/home" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Raoul Textiles" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Raoul Textiles</a>. </div> <cite class="credit">Simon Upton </cite>

Simon Upton ” src=”https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/MvMCmC_NwaYDW2wVgucULQ–/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTk2MDtoPTEyNzkuNzc5MzEwMzQ0ODI3NQ–/https://media.zenfs.com/en/architectural_digest_422/72ce1b023467a80954461b1ab81f7a99″ class=”caas-img”/>

Kemp (right) and her daughters Minnie (center) and Willow lounge on the drawing room sofa, which wears a linen by Raoul Textiles.

Simon Upton

<div class="caption"> In the entry, flat-weave rugs were fashioned into a stair runner, antique mirror. </div> <cite class="credit">Simon Upton </cite>

Simon Upton ” src=”https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/Os2J386QdElIzobnref1_g–/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTk2MDtoPTEyNzkuNzc5MzEwMzQ0ODI3NQ–/https://media.zenfs.com/en/architectural_digest_422/00797c87aae552ee82227176c05c1c30″ class=”caas-img”/>

In the entry, flat-weave rugs were fashioned into a stair runner, antique mirror.

Simon Upton

The address to which Kemp has pledged her devotion for 20 years and raised three daughters is a three-story, gray brick, vaguely medieval house on a cul-de-sac near Hyde Park, around the corner from Royal Albert Hall and a couple of blocks off heavily trafficked asbestos removal and testing Kensington Road. Still, she says, “it’s almost quieter here than in the countryside.” Since the couple bought the 1930s property, the L-shaped residence has undergone a series of transformative adjustments, all the better to express, at any particular moment, what the designer describes as “the way we live now.” Dormers have been added, and windows have been enlarged. Early on, the garage at the rear of the property was remodeled into an apartment for a nanny; today it serves as a gym. “I’m always having a little experiment with this or that,” says Kemp, who has called her style colorful and carefree. “My poor husband has to put up with it.”

<div class="caption"> A Mark Gertler painting hangs over the drawing room's neoclassical mantel. Cocktail tables by <a href="https://tomstogdon.com/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Tom Stogdon" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Tom Stogdon</a> for <a href="https://kitkemp.com/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Kit Kemp" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Kit Kemp</a>; African side table; antique rug. </div> <cite class="credit">Simon Upton </cite>

Simon Upton ” src=”https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/M2NgQy8ws538IsERPG8log–/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTk2MDtoPTEyNDYuODk2NTUxNzI0MTM4/https://media.zenfs.com/en/architectural_digest_422/f8646dbeceb662bef815d65c54608928″ class=”caas-img”/>