Yes, Your Home Being Messy May Affect Your Mental Health

Photo credit: Jonathan Rachman/Suzanna Scott
Photo credit: Jonathan Rachman/Suzanna Scott

From House Beautiful

Given the extended amount of time we’ve spent at home in recent months, there’s no denying the importance of turning your home into a personal oasis. After all, the state of our homes can directly influence the state of our minds. Dr. Toby Israel, author of Some Place Like Home: Using Design Psychology to Create Ideal Places, used this idea as the founding principle for the field of Design Psychology, which proves a point we at House Beautiful have long thought to be true: Our visual surroundings have a profound impact on our mental health.

On a basic level, Israel says, principles of light and color affect mood: “Light colors may make a space feel more open whereas darker colors may make people feel more closed in,” she explains. “Thus, for those quarantining right now, it might seem to make

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L.A. mayor calls on artists to design and spread the message: Wear a mask

A free, downloadable poster, designed by Shepard Fairey's Studio Number One and Camilla Lonis, is part of the city's new L.A. Mask Print Project. <span class="copyright">(Studio Number One)</span>
A free, downloadable poster, designed by Shepard Fairey’s Studio Number One and Camilla Lonis, is part of the city’s new L.A. Mask Print Project. (Studio Number One)

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti’s latest weapon against COVID-19? Art.

On Wednesday, Garcetti announced a new initiative called the L.A. Mask Print Project, in which L.A. County artists can submit designs for posters bearing the public health message of the moment: Wear a mask. Posters chosen for the city’s coronavirus website can be downloaded for free, and Garcetti is encouraging local businesses and residents to display them.

“Wearing a mask is critical to helping us stop the spread of this virus, safely reopen our city and save lives,” Garcetti said in an email to The Times. “And we need to use every tool at our disposal to deliver this message across Los Angeles, throughout our country and around the world.”

Shepard Fairey’s Studio

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A Chinese Carmaker Has Already Ripped Off The Ford Bronco’s Design

Well, that looks suspiciously similar.

Chinese automakers are infamous for cribbing the designs of other makes and models. Even as the Chinese auto industry matures, there are still new models coming out that look awfully similar to those of other automakers. The latest comes from Wey, a brand established by Great Wall Motors in 2017, and it seems like it used the new Ford Bronco as the starting and finishing points.  

Codenamed the Wey P01, the rugged-looking SUV only has a handful of teasers available for us to look at, though they do show off quite a bit. Both the Bronco and P01 feature upright front ends with Wey going as far as to flip the Bronco’s headlight design treatment as if no one would notice. They even wrap around it the front to the front fender to give it a bit of personality. However, it does feature a

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This Portland Home Was Designed to Feel Like a Parisian Apartment

Photo credit: Haris Kenjar
Photo credit: Haris Kenjar

From House Beautiful

Tudor-style bungalow homes from the 1940s with small kitchens and disjointed flows are fairly common in northeast Portland, and the one that JHL Design was hired to renovate for a family of three was no different. But rather than seeing problems, the Portland-based interior design firm saw possibilities: original mahogany woodwork, original hardwood doors, and small details like intact picture rails in the formal living spaces. So, together with Thesis Studio Architecture, the team worked out a plan that added only 150 square feet to the footprint—but through what JHL Design principal Holly Freres calls “a rearrangement of space” made the home feel significantly larger.

Photo credit: Haris Kenjar
Photo credit: Haris Kenjar

The first step was to reconfigure the entire main floor, which contained a narrow kitchen and two bedrooms at the back of the house. The bedrooms, Freres explains, “monopolized access to the private,

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